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Radon Mitigation in Georgia

June 17, 2014
A house foundation being rid of radon.

Radon is a very real and present threat for homeowners. Exposure to this naturally occurring gas causes more deaths in the United States each year than drunk driving, and is the second leading cause of lung cancer right behind smoking.

While radon can be found outdoors, the real cause for concern comes when it seeps into a home, where it stagnates and becomes toxic to those living inside. The Georgia Department of Community Affairs website is a great resource for learning about the basics of radon, how to find out if your home is exposed to radon and what to do in the event that your house tests positive for radon.

Here are some of the main things you need to know about radon exposure:

  • Radon is a colorless, odorless gas. There is no way to tell if your home has radon until you test the air.
  • Test kits are easy to order. Radon test kits are the only way to make sure your home isn’t exposed to radon. All you have to do is fill out the form and pay $10.

  • Certain counties in Georgia are at higher risk than others. The UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences offers a great webpage full of resources for radon exposure, including a color-coded map of counties that are at high risk for radon exposure.

  • If your home tests positive for radon, you need to hire a mitigator. Radon mitigation professionals will rid your home of the toxic gas. The National Radon Safety Board website has a search engine that can find a mitigation specialist near you. From there, you can follow some easy steps to decide which company is right for you.

Radon exposure can be an intimidating topic, but the best course of action is to test your home as soon as possible. For more information on radon mitigation, call the Office of Planning and Environmental Management at 478-319-0433.

About the Author

A Georgia native, Rachael Wheeler works as a Web Support Specialist for GeorgiaGov. She writes about a variety of current topics relevant to the Georgia government.