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Understanding Window Tint Laws

May 21, 2013
A red hot hatch sports tinted windows.

For quick reference, see our Window Tint Laws infographic.

In the past year, several GeorgiaGov visitors have stopped by to ask about Georgia's window tint law. Here's what you should know:

By state law, unless you've applied for a medical exemption, you cannot tint your car's front windshield at all, and you cannot reduce light transmission through your rear windshield and windows to less than 32%. You also can't increase light reflectance to more than 20% for the rear windshield and windows. If an officer pulls you over for violating these provisions, you'll earn a misdemeanor.

The Department of Public Safety offers medical exemptions to the window tint law for select drivers and passengers. When you apply for the exemption, you'll need to submit both a note from your physician or optometrist and a $10 processing fee.

Several other exemptions to the window tint law stand in place for commercial and government vehicles. You can read those at the Official Code of Georgia. Search the keyword "window," or browse Title 40, the subsection that covers laws for motor vehicles and traffic.

 

Last updated April 26, 2017.

GeorgiaGov Writer Noralil Ryan Fores

About the Author

Noralil Ryan Fores writes about business, taxes, elections and the environment for GeorgiaGov. She's a graduate of Florida State University's film school and Syracuse University's journalism program.

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