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8 Tips to Keep Safe from Lightning

June 30, 2014
Lightning streaks spread across a night sky.

Summertime in Georgia brings about frequent storms that can get nasty in a short amount of time. While it may seem like a rumbling in the distance doesn’t pose a threat to your safety, it's still important to be careful during a thunderstorm.

The National Weather Service offers some helpful tips for staying safe when a storm rolls in.

  • No place outside is safe during a thunderstorm. If you can hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you.
  • Head inside as soon as you hear the first clap of thunder, and don’t go outdoors until 30 minutes have passed since the last thunderclap.
  • While inside a house, avoid using corded phones, computers or other electrical devices.
  • Stay away from windows, plumbing, doors and concrete floors or walls.

If you find yourself trapped outside with no way to seek shelter indoors, there are a few options for reducing your risk of being struck by lightning.

  • Get away from elevated areas such as hills or mountain tops.
  • Don't try to hide under an isolated tree.
  • Stay far away from bodies of water such as lakes or ponds.
  • Don’t try to shelter yourself under a cliff or rocky overhang.

Always remember to use your best judgment when lightning is in your area. When possible, head indoors as soon as you can. For more information, check out the Myths and Facts section of the NWS lightning page. Have a safe summer!

About the Author

A Georgia native, Rachael Wheeler works as a Web Support Specialist for GeorgiaGov. She writes about a variety of current topics relevant to the Georgia government.

 

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